2 comments on “FREE SPEECH AND THE RIGHT TO BOYCOTT

  1. Democracies inevitably erode over time, if you doubt that spend a little time in the history department at your local library or the internet.
    Democracy in this country is no exception predicated among a number of issues such as a militarized police force, behind closed doors machinations in government, FISA courts, an ongoing assault on liberties, riders attached to legislative bills the public is neither aware of nor probably inclined to agree with, an increasing lack of ethics and personal integrity in government, the cultivation of national division, and an equally increasing amount of influence by all the wrong people and corporate entities.
    It isn’t now nor has it ever been a “patriots” duty to tolerate, absorb, or condone injustice, governmental corruption or dysfunction – they aren’t obliged to say my country right or wrong.
    The obligation is to acknowledge these things and raise their voice rather than facilitate.
    For those who speak with reverence of the “founding fathers”, former presidents and the precepts of the documents this nation was founded upon consider the below quotes:

    “The jaws of power are always open to devour, and her arm is always stretched out, if possible, to destroy the freedom of thinking, speaking, and writing.”
    John Adams

    “Now more than ever before, the people are responsible for the character of their Congress. If that body be ignorant, reckless and corrupt, it is because the people tolerate ignorance, recklessness and corruption. If it be intelligent, brave and pure, it is because the people demand these high qualities to represent them in the national legislature…. If the next centennial does not find us a great nation … it will be because those who represent the enterprise, the culture, and the morality of the nation do not aid in controlling the political forces.”
    James Garfield, the twentieth president of the United States, 1877

    “The liberties of a people never were, nor ever will be, secure, when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them.”
    Patrick Henry, American colonial revolutionary

    • In ruminating over this I’ ve thought to add more:

      I’m something of an outsider looking in as the Constitution, Bill of Rights, and a huge number of legislative bills passed over time were never inclusive of the nations and other notable minorities from the imported laborers the Chinese were working on the railroads to the Japanese confined to internment camps during WW2.
      The “humanist” thought said to be an inspiration that all men were created equal came with a number of exceptions from indentured servitude and slavery to genocide.
      Referencing men as in “all men are created equal” may have been a generic catchall meant to include women but in consideration of much that continues to this day to assume so is argumentative at best.
      Those with wealth and influence have a greater “equality”, always have and undoubtedly always will, the lower down the socio economic ladder the less “equality” – that too seems to be eternally cast in stone.
      It is a truth for any people, any nation, that as the language goes so too the culture and people – I believe the same can be said of rights and Constitutional guarantees, as they go so too a nation and it’s people.
      The “liberties” enumerated in the Bill of Rights are in a very real sense the language of this country – a common language governing the pursuits not just of government but the people as well.
      Languages evolve, but it is the manner in which they evolve, the common usage and understanding that defines the value and ultimately the conduct associated with it.

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